Category Archives: textile industry

Recapping our Fall Trade Show Calendar

It was a busy time for us this fall as we traveled to different events across the U.S. As we have mentioned before, attending these industry trade shows and conferences is an ideal way to hear what certain industries need in their products and to discuss options and possible solutions we can provide. This fall we attended three events:

2015 AUSA Annual Meeting and Exposition: This land power exposition and professional development forum offered presentations and discussions on military and national security subjects as well as workshops and business meetings. Over 26,000 attendees came from around the world to Washington, D.C. for this event and we were proud to be part of it.

SEAMS National Networking Conference: This event was held on October 29-31 at the Gaylord Opryland Resort and Convention Center in Nashville, TN. At SEAMS, the National Association for the U.S. Sewn Products and Textiles Industries, we participated in educational opportunities, conferences, and networking events designed around the theme of “Spurring Opportunities for Growth.” The conference highlighted strategies, relationships and takeaways to drive growth and improve business.

AIX Expo: The Aircraft Interiors Expo took place on November 4 & 5 in Seattle, WA. Showcasing the latest designs in aircraft interiors, this event allowed us to network with others in the industry to discuss industry trends and where the aircraft interiors business and the airlines industry is moving toward for the future.

Although very different, these three events all cross over into the textile industry. With the connections and information learned from attending these events, we are better able to serve our customers in developing the products they require.

To learn more about our products and services, please feel free to contact us or visit our website.

Jason Mills And The IFAI Expo

Last month the annual Industrial Fabrics Expo was held in Anaheim, California. Over 400 exhibitors, including Jason Mills, LLC were present, as were many thousands of attendees. Most of the attendees were serious about seeking out information and suppliers for the current year. Over the last 5 – 7 years we have seen the quality of the buyer improve and engagement usually kept at a serious level. Truth be told, we still had those running from booth to booth looking for your best price.

Those that stopped by our booth saw not only our 50+ standard knit industrial textiles, including our 20-30 stock items, but also development fabrics such as our style 413 for the outdoor trade (UV, water and fire resistant), style 501 for the indoor golf and simulator trade (finely knit for ultra HD imagery and fire resistant), as well as our two layer style 280 exclusively for healthcare industry (fire resistant, ultra load bearing and incredible liquid management).

It is true that exhibiting at trade shows is a costly endeavor, but the takeaway is that there is not any other venue in which you can come face to face with 80-100 potential new customers in a three day period. Along with print advertising, social media and a dynamic website, the trade show is a pillar of any growing company’s marketing plan.

This year’s venue, being on the west coast allowed regional visitors who might not normally make the trip to the familiar textile stomping grounds in the east; we’ll save that for Charlotte in 2016.

In the meantime, please visit our website at www.jasonmills.com or send us an email to info@jasonmills.com. Remember, all of Jason Mills’ products are knit, dyed and finished in the U.S.A.

Textile Industry Growth, Opportunities and Issues

Earlier this year we discussed the continued growth of the technical textile industry. Technological advances in areas such as nano textiles and carbon fibers are two such examples of how technology can open opportunities and advance the expansion of the industry as a whole.

The National Council of Textile Organization (NCTO) Chairman Jeff Price recently discussed some of the issues that will be explored in 2015. This includes pending international trade agreements  such as the Transpacific Partnership (TPP) and the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). The group will also be working on industry expansion, new markets, and new products. The feeling is that as the industry continues to expand through the application of US developed and manufactured fibers and textiles we will have a stronger voice to help mold these agreements in a positive fashion.

At Jason Mills we’re optimistic that we’ll continue to see growth throughout the year. Like the NTCO we take a keen awareness in seeing that our interests are voiced as various hot button issues move forward.

As far as product development goes, we’ve been focusing particularly on researching new and innovative textiles such as aluminized composites. Standard nonwovens are traditionally used in industries such as housing construction as they are lightweight and inexpensive. However, adjust the product so that a standard non woven becomes a water impermeable composite (yet retaining its vapor permeability), then you have a potential for a game changing result. We are also researching inherently antimicrobial yarns and possible non-traditional applications for these textiles.

To learn more about Jason Mills and all the technical textiles we offer, visit our website. We also post more textile industry news on our Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+.

Technical Textiles Expect Continued Growth

At Jason Mills we’re always excited to come across positive industry news and share it with our readers. Recently, we read in Textile World that technical textiles continue to see growth. Technical textiles, like the ones we manufacture, can be used across a variety of industries, including automotive, medical, personal safety, and sanitation supply; using finishes such as anti microbial, fire resistance and ultra violet resistance. With such a range of applications it’s no surprise to us that this sector of the textile industry is one of the main areas of growth for the western hemisphere.

According to research from the Gherzi Textile Organisation 25% of fibers were used in technical textiles in the 1990s and today that number is over 55% and the use of textiles in industrial applications is only expected to go up. The research also found that from 1990-2012 fiber processing moved more towards technical textiles with the number of man-made fibers increasing from 68% to 91%.

Our company specializes in the sourcing, manufacturing, warehousing, and distribution of polyester and nylon knit mesh fabrics for industrial use. To find out more about our products and services and how we can help provide technical textiles for your application, visit our website. We also actively post about the textile industry on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+.

Medical Textile Innovations

Recently Textile World hosted an Innovation Forum in Atlanta, GA which focused some of the innovations in the textile industry, including those in engineering, processing, and R&D. At Jason Mills we are always paying attention to latest technology in the industry and right now we’re really excited about some of the innovations in moisture management and antimicrobial finishes.

An antimicrobial finish’s purpose is to kill any microbe that comes in contact with the material before it can harm the end user. Antimicrobial finishes are incredibly important in the medical and healthcare sector, but what is exciting is it can be applied to a variety of other industries as well such as use in military applications or even keeping sweat off a gym treadmill.  Similarly moisture management finishes are designed to repel water and can be applied to other industries such as outdoor goods.

While both of these may be found naturally in a yarn, more often than not the finish is a chemical agent that is applied topically to the fabric at the end of production. Some of the chemicals used as antimicrobial agents include quaternary ammonium, triclosan, and metallic salts, which can be applied to polymer surfaces, cotton, and other textiles.

We’ll continue to follow the textile trends and keep you updated on the latest in the industry and you can follow us on Twitter for more textile news.

Jason Mills Exhibiting at the IFAI Expo

At Jason Mills we strive to attend and exhibit at trade shows throughout the year to allow us to learn about the latest advances in our industry and we’re excited to announce that we’ll be exhibiting at the IFAI Expo this October. The Industrial Fabrics Association International (IFAI) Expo will be held at the Minneapolis Convention Center on October 14-16th. The event focuses on advanced and specialty fabrics and provides educational sessions in addition to networking events, meetings and of course walking the exhibit floor. The IFAI Expo boasts more than 400 exhibitors and brings in thousands of attendees from all around the world.

Jason Mills with be at booth 2549 where we will be showcasing all of our products. Attendees will have the opportunity to meet with our company president, sales director, production coordinator and sales associate. As a forward thinking firm we’re always on the lookout for more and more technical materials and are excited to discuss some of the innovations in our field with attendees. We’re especially focused on some of the advances in the healthcare field including antimicrobial materials, antistatic materials and polypropylene materials. We encourage attendees to stop by to meet our team and discuss some of these advances. Attendees can learn more about our product offerings before the show visit our website and follow us on Twitter to see our tweets from the expo.

Global Cotton Usage and the Synthetic Market

Jason Mills, LLC is a manufacturer of knit textile products. Although our fabrics are derived exclusively from synthetic fibers, the global usage of cotton can still play a large role in our costs as many factors are inter-related. Chief amongst them is supply vs. demand. Cotton being a natural fiber is prone to huge shifts in costs as global climate change can wreck havoc on the crop. This of course can create a spike in cotton prices as was seen in 2011. Manufacturers that normally used 100% cotton began using synthetic blends to reduce expenses. Consequently this lead to higher demand for synthetic fibers, and thus costs were driven upward.

This can especially be seen in America now. The US has recently seen an increase in demand for synthetic fabrics as the price for cotton remains unstable. Additionally, companies discovered that buyers didn’t necessarily have a preference for cotton or synthetic fibers. Even though cotton prices have once again dropped, the demand for synthetics is still high. Hanes (a huge global user of cotton) Brand T-shirts recently announced that it would shift away from 100% cotton to a blend synthetic fiber.

To learn more about Jason Mills and our selection of industrial textiles, visit our website. And follow us on Twitter to stay up-to-date on the textile industry.

Jason Mills Announces Its Attendance at Techtextil North America

Jason Mills is excited to announce that we’ll be showcasing our product line at this year’s Techtextil North America. The show is dedicated to technical textiles and nonwovens, covering industries as diverse as agriculture, home furnishings and sports equipment. This year’s show will be held from May 13th – 15th at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, GA.

We’ll be located at booth #1918 and featuring some of our latest products for the automotive, medical, and safety apparel industries. For the automotive industry, we’ll introduce Jason Mills’s style 415. This is a shade screen material that is fire resistant and highly resistant to UV fading and degradation. With exposure ratings of over 2,000 hours this material is ideally suited for vehicle interiors.

Additionally, we have two new styles for the healthcare materials industry designed for excessive load bearing to be used in patient slings.

Also in development are enhancements to our cut resistant line. Designed for the safety apparel industry these fabrics are being designed to meet ANSI level 4 standards.

To see all the items we’ll be showing stop by our booth and for those who’d like to attend for free follow this link. And be sure to follow Jason Mills on Twitter as we tweet about the show using the #TechtextilNorthAmerica. To attend the show for free, register here.

The Past, Present, and Future of the Textile Industry

Textile manufacturing is a fascinating and diverse industry, with a long and complex history, and exciting advances in modern technology that are continually being modified and improved.  To have an appreciation for the industry, we’d like to explore some of the roots of the textile industry, and then discuss some of what we’re anticipating for the future of textile fabrication.

Humankind has been interlacing threads and fibers for a very long time to make a variety of things, ranging from baskets and rugs to clothing and tapestries.  Textiles can have both practical uses and artistic value, and often both.  Several historical examples come to mind, such as the famous and desirable hand-woven Persian rugs, or the iconic Greek togas and tunics.  Textile trade flourished on the famed “Silk Road” where different dyes and materials made their way across Eurasia, disseminating different styles and practices, and contributing to the interdependence we see across ancient, medieval, and early modern culture, a phenomenon currently being showcased at the “Interwoven Globe” Exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

Today, synthetic materials and automated looms have modernized the industry from the organic materials and hand-craftsmanship of its past.  The range and capability of modern synthetic materials and processes has vastly increased the type and capabilities of textiles, with applications as diverse as medical mesh, automotive textiles, and protective abrasion-resistant materials.  As technology moves forward, advances like 4D printing may have significant implications for a whole new scope of industries, as we are increasingly able to create materials that respond to external stimuli and adapt or change in specific ways based on what is around them.

Jason Mills has both a fond appreciation for the things that have brought the textile industry to its current place, and an eye on the future, as we see technology progress in exciting new ways and directions.  Make sure to visit our blog again to get our latest opinions and insights into the vast and interwoven world of the textile industry.

The Fundamentals of Global Textile Trade and the TPP

The textile industry has seen extensive news coverage recently for a number of reasons, especially as it relates to the ongoing negotiations of the Trans-Pacific Partnership on international trade policy between some 12 countries, and several more key interested observers.  The effects of these negotiations for textile trade between these countries are significant.  For the purposes of this blog, we’ll only examine an overview of the issues, and perhaps expound upon our findings in a follow up blog as the negotiations develop, so our readers can come to appreciate some the subtlety and the stakes of these talks.

Foremost among the concerns for the textiles industry in the TPP is the reaffirmation of a version of the “yarn-forward” rule, which has been present in most U.S. Trade agreements since NAFTA.  The yarn forward rule outlines rules of origin for textiles manufacturers, and specifies that in every stage “from the yarn forward” of the manufacturing process, the materials and processes must be sourced from a member of the partnership agreement.  This “puts the spotlight” on Vietnam, which, if the negotiations move forward without the yarn forward rule, could act as a conduit for duty-free Chinese access to the U.S. Textile market.

This opens the door to another, highly contentious debate about global trade policy: fair trade vs. free trade.  To avoid the risk of becoming too much of an economics lecture, we’ll note that generally, Jason Mills falls on the side of fair trade, which we see as taking advantage of the ideal that is a robust and healthy global trade network, and seeking to account for the fundamental imbalance in working conditions, wage scale, and economic and environmental responsibility of participating nations.  Having said that, global trade is an increasingly complex machine, and we think that attitudes and positions need to be accordingly complex.

As policy discussions like the TPP and similar initiatives from the WTO and other organizations emerge, we think it’s a part of our job here at Jason Mills to be informed and aware of the implications of pending discussions not just for our business, but for our industry as a whole.  We’ll be sure to continue to give our readers a window into the textile manufacturing world, and provide our perspectives here on our blog, so make sure to stop back soon!